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Weeds

Numerous plant species are considered weeds in agronomic cropping systems. Weeds have many attributes undesirable to crop producers, not the least being the ability to reduce crop yields through competition for resources such as sunlight, water, nutrients, and space. Weeds also may harbor insects and provide a host for certain plant pathogens. Some weed species, such as wild garlic and eastern black nightshade, can reduce the quality of the harvested crop. Eliminating or reducing the deleterious effects of weeds on agronomic crops is the ultimate goal of weed management. Integrated weed management includes all practices that enhance a crop's competitive ability and decrease weeds' ability to reduce yield.

Successful weed management requires identifying relevant species and understanding their biological characteristics so that management can be tailored to the weeds present in individual fields. Accurate identification is critical: identification of seedling weeds is necessary for selecting an appropriate postemergence herbicide, while identifying mature weeds often indicates which species will populate a particular field the following season. Most weed species in Illinois agronomic cropping systems are either broadleaves or grasses. Broadleaf species are generally easier to differentiate than grasses, especially at early growth stages. Many excellent identification references are available, including the several listed here; one or more should be part of every weed management practitioner's library.

Most weeds of agronomic cropping systems are herbaceous, but a few species that can become established in reduced-tillage fields are woody (such as maple trees). Weeds can be categorized according to their life cycle, or how long they live: annual, biennial, and perennial. Knowledge of life cycles is important to reducing the potential for weeds to produce viable seed or vegetative structures that aid in weed dispersal.

Copied from Chapter 12 of the Illinois Agronomy Handbook
Aaron Hager, Author


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